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The latest news on Sunday Scaries from Business Insider
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    It has many names. Some call it the "Sunday Scaries." Others call it "The Weirds,""The Sunday Blues," or "The Sunday Spookies." Most people know it as "The Fear."

    It's an acute anxiety that creeps up on us as we begin to transition from the weekend to the reality of the impending work-week. Here are a few tips that will help you make the transition without feeling "The Fear."

    Produced by Graham Flanagan.

    NOW WATCH: Why Mosquitoes Bite Some People But Not Others

    Follow BI Video: on Twitter

    Join the conversation about this story »


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    It has many names. Some call it the "Sunday Scaries." Others call it "The Weirds,""The Sunday Blues," or "The Sunday Spookies." Most people know it as "The Fear."

    It's an acute anxiety that creeps up on us as we begin to transition from the weekend to the reality of the impending work-week. Here are a few tips that will help you make the transition without feeling "The Fear."

    Produced by Graham Flanagan.

    NOW WATCH: Why Mosquitoes Bite Some People But Not Others

    Follow BI Video: on Twitter

    Join the conversation about this story »


    0 0

    It has many names. Some call it the "Sunday scaries." Others call it "the weirds,""the Sunday blues," or "the Sunday spookies." Most people know it as "the fear."

    It's an acute anxiety that creeps up on us as we begin to transition from the weekend to the reality of the impending workweek. Here are a few tips that will help you make the transition without feeling "the fear."

    Produced by Graham Flanagan.

    Join the conversation about this story »


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    crying

    There are a lot of good reasons to quit a job: your values don't align with those of your employer; you don't get along with your boss; you're not passionate about the work you're doing; you're burnt out; you've got a better offer in hand.

    But perhaps the biggest sign it's time to throw in the towel is that pit-in-your-stomach feeling some of us get when the weekend comes to a close ... also known as the "Sunday Night Blues" or the "Sunday Scaries."

    Of course we all experience the occasional wave of dread on Sunday evening — especially after a fun weekend or when you have a particularly busy workweek ahead. In fact, a whopping 76% of American workers say they get the Sunday Night Blues, according to a Monster survey.

    But if you spend every Sunday feeling anxious, depressed, or fearful — sobbing on the couch, drafting your "I'm sick" email for Monday morning — it's probably time to move on.

    "Having the Sunday Night Blues can be a common phenomenon for anyone," says Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and author of "Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job." "You're transitioning from a leisure mindset to work, with all its daily challenges. But if you're feeling trapped, hopeless, or anxious about your job for weeks or months as you face Monday — it's time to look for greener pastures."

    She says writing down your feelings always adds clarity. "You don't have to produce an elaborate, perfectly crafted document of pros and cons," she says. "It's sometimes easier, more heartfelt, and effective to jot down your thoughts in a free-form way, as if you were having a conversation." For example: "I'm feeling as if I have to work at this company, or else I will ..." or, "I feel sick when I think about how my boss has been acting towards me." "As you read it, your feelings can better evolve into specific actions," she says.

    Life is way too short to squander on a job that causes you prolonged misery or stress, Taylor adds. "The anxiety can spill into your weekend, and not just steal your joy — but compromise your health, too. The key thing to remember is that you do have choices. Your career future is only limited by your imagination."

    SEE ALSO: 9 things successful people do on Sunday nights

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: The CEO of one of the largest health insurers in the US explains the problem with healthcare in America


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    Eeyore Sad Depressed Winnie the Pooh

    There are a lot of good reasons to quit a job: Your values don't align with those of your employer, you don't get along with your boss, you're not passionate about the work you're doing, you're burned out, you've got a better offer in hand.

    But perhaps the biggest sign that it's time to throw in the towel is that pit-in-your-stomach feeling some of us get when the weekend comes to a close ... aka the "Sunday Night Blues" or the "Sunday Scaries."

    Of course, we all experience the occasional wave of dread on Sunday evening — especially after a fun weekend or when you have a particularly busy workweek ahead. In fact, a whopping 76% of American workers say that they get the Sunday Night Blues, according to a Monster survey.

    But if you spend every Sunday feeling anxious, depressed, or fearful — sobbing on the couch, drafting your "I'm sick" email for Monday morning — then it's probably time to move on.

    Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of "Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job," says:

    "Having the Sunday Night Blues can be a common phenomenon for anyone. You're transitioning from a leisure mindset to work, with all its daily challenges. But if you're feeling trapped, hopeless, or anxious about your job for weeks or months as you face Monday — it's time to look for greener pastures."

    She says that writing down your feelings always adds clarity:

    "You don't have to produce an elaborate, perfectly crafted document of pros and cons. It's sometimes easier, more heartfelt, and effective to jot down your thoughts in a free-form way, as if you were having a conversation. For example: 'I'm feeling as if I have to work at this company, or else I will ...' or, 'I feel sick when I think about how my boss has been acting towards me.' As you read it, your feelings can better evolve into specific actions."

    Life is way too short to squander on a job that causes you prolonged misery or stress, Taylor adds:

    "The anxiety can spill into your weekend, and not just steal your joy — but compromise your health, too. The key thing to remember is that you do have choices. Your career future is only limited by your imagination."

    SEE ALSO: 9 things successful people do on Sunday nights

    DON'T MISS: 19 signs that it's time to quit your job

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: What happened when the Sam Adams founder told his dad he was quitting a $250,000-a-year job to make beer


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    heartbroken sad crying

    There are a lot of good reasons to quit a job: Your values don't align with those of your employer, you don't get along with your boss, you're not passionate about the work you're doing, you're burned out, you've got a better offer in hand.

    But perhaps the biggest sign that it's time to throw in the towel is that pit-in-your-stomach feeling some of us get when the weekend comes to a close ... aka the "Sunday Night Blues" or the "Sunday Scaries."

    Of course, we all experience the occasional wave of dread on Sunday evening — especially after a fun weekend or when you have a particularly busy workweek ahead. In fact, a whopping 76% of American workers say that they get the Sunday Night Blues, according to a Monster survey.

    But if you spend every Sunday feeling anxious, depressed, or fearful — sobbing on the couch, drafting your "I'm sick" email for Monday morning — then it's probably time to move on.

    Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of "Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job," says:

    "Having the Sunday Night Blues can be a common phenomenon for anyone. You're transitioning from a leisure mindset to work, with all its daily challenges. But if you're feeling trapped, hopeless, or anxious about your job for weeks or months as you face Monday — it's time to look for greener pastures."

    She says that writing down your feelings always adds clarity:

    "You don't have to produce an elaborate, perfectly crafted document of pros and cons. It's sometimes easier, more heartfelt, and effective to jot down your thoughts in a free-form way, as if you were having a conversation. For example: 'I'm feeling as if I have to work at this company, or else I will ...' or, 'I feel sick when I think about how my boss has been acting towards me.' As you read it, your feelings can better evolve into specific actions."

    Life is way too short to squander on a job that causes you prolonged misery or stress, Taylor adds:

    "The anxiety can spill into your weekend, and not just steal your joy — but compromise your health, too. The key thing to remember is that you do have choices. Your career future is only limited by your imagination."

    SEE ALSO: 9 things successful people do on Sunday nights

    DON'T MISS: 19 signs that it's time to quit your job

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: What happened when the Sam Adams founder told his dad he was quitting a $250,000-a-year job to make beer


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    It has many names. Some call it the "Sunday scaries." Others call it "the weirds,""the Sunday blues," or "the Sunday spookies." Most people know it as "the fear."

    It's an acute anxiety that creeps up on us as we begin to transition from the weekend to the reality of the impending workweek. Here are a few tips that will help you make the transition without feeling "the fear."

    Join the conversation about this story »


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    couple riding bikes

    • The 'Sunday Blues' is the common phenomenon of feeling sad, stressed, or anxious before the start of the workweek. 
    • You can avoid them by adding a few simple habits into your routine. 
    • Spend some time on Sunday in silence, develop a mantra, or prioritize you and your family. 


    I love these types of Sundays, with beautiful spring weather and the promise of a bike ride with my daughter. 

    The problem is that I also stress about Sundays, since it is typically my day for catching up with incomplete action items and countless unread emails, which back up after a long and busy week.

    For years, my weekend included what I called the dreaded Sunday Blues — a non-scientific diagnosis of the anxiety and stress many feel on Sunday when the grind of the following week is upon them.

    A while ago, however, I decided to recapture my Sundays and make it a day I enjoy again. Doing so did not require changing my weekly schedule or adding action items. Instead, it was a simple mental shift.

    If these Sunday Blues symptoms sound familiar, here are a few tips I have found useful for taking back your Sundays.

    Sit in silence

    I am an advocate for spending at least 10 minutes daily in complete silence. I understand this can be difficult for a busy professional — and adding a kid pleading for a bike ride makes it much more challenging.

    Silence, however, has been proven to relieve stress, replenish overworked mental resources, regenerate brain cells, and activate our brain's "default mode network."

    Silence does not include reaching for your nature sound machine or noise-reducing headphones and relaxing music. One study examining the effects of music on the body found that randomly introduced short periods of complete silence — as little as two minutes — resulted in lower blood pressure and heart rate.

    This Sunday, take 10 minutes in the morning and sit in complete silence, practice mindfulness, and allow your brain to rejuvenate. It will help you tackle the end of your weekend.

    Develop mantras

    While mantras are mostly associated with yoga and spiritual enlightenment, I find them to be more a practice of positive thought.

    To develop yours, first listen to your thoughts — I mean really listen to them. What are they telling you? Like me, you are probably scolding yourself for not being more productive during the week or otherwise misusing your time.The truth is, most of us have power over our own thoughts.

    Try developing a few useful mantras, or simple positive phrases, that you can repeat when you feel overwhelmed and anxious about the upcoming week. You do not need to sit in front of a mirror and sound like Stuart Smalley with Daily Affirmations. Just turn your negative thoughts into positive thoughts until you train yourself to take more control.

    Prioritize you and your family

    Your clients, your bosses or everyone waiting for a response will be there on Monday. If you have not responded to them by Sunday, they can one day longer.

    Instead, use Sunday to prioritize yourself. This should be your day to do things you did not have time to do during the week, like exercise, watch a movie, or enjoy a game (this is why NFL games are on Sunday). Stop feeling guilty for time dedicated to resting, relaxing and recharging one day a week.

    If you are responsible for family members, remember also that it was nobody's dying wish that they had spent more time in the office — most wish they had spent more time with family. After you have your time, make sure to dedicate some time to them.

    Most of this is a mindset change, which takes practice and perseverance. I can tell you that once you master it, you will never dread a Sunday again.

    As for me, I went on the bike ride. Hanging out with a curious and adventurous six year old is all the recharge I need.

    SEE ALSO: 17 things successful people do over long weekends

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: How a black cop infiltrated the KKK — the true story behind Spike Lee's 'BlacKkKlansman'


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    melody wilding

    • Melody Wilding is an executive coach who helps people navigate their careers confidently and find lasting work-life balance.
    • She says that Sunday scaries are normal, but avoidable. Even doing something small on Friday that you would usually do on Monday can help soothe concerns. And starting off Mondays with something you enjoy can combat lingering dread.
    • Treat Sundays as sacred, and schedule something you find restorative. If scaries still persist, it may be worth talking to someone.
    • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

    In a perfect world, a typical Sunday would be relaxing and refreshing — a true leisure day. But for many of us, the end of the weekend brings a sense of dread, often referred to as the "Sunday scaries." 

    Nagging thoughts about work may creep up as soon as you wake up or sneak in even after a lovely day of brunch with friends. Heading into Monday with high anxiety can leave you feeling exhausted and depleted right out of the gate, leaving you with little motivation to conquer the week ahead. 

    If you've ever had a case of the Sunday scaries, it's important to know you're not alone. Over 76% of people battle with "really bad" Sunday night blues. Even though workweek anticipation seems inevitable (and almost universal, at least in the US), you don't have to keep settling for that pit-in-your stomach feeling forever. 

    Try these four adjustments to say goodbye to the Sunday scaries and transform your attitude for the week ahead. 

    SEE ALSO: 3 ways to restore your confidence after getting criticism at work, according to a career coach

    1. Don't let life pile up

    It's tempting to put off personal matters — like meal prep, errands, and mail — on workdays. Deferring and batching similar tasks is a smart way to be productive, but overestimating what you can accomplish on a single Sunday leaves you feeling frustrated, which is not conducive to peacefulness.  

    Removing the pressure to get your life together within a hectic, 24-hour window helps you feel accomplished, unrushed, and level-headed so you can start your week off on the right foot.

    Start early and spread things out: Before leaving your desk on Friday afternoon, check off a few tasks you'd normally put off until Monday, like zeroing your inbox or paying bills. Make tying up loose ends on Sunday more manageable by tackling household chores at a steady pace throughout the week. 



    2. Make Sundays special or sacred

    Sunday is half of the weekend, so make the most of it. You don't have to plan an adventure that will leave you exhausted on Monday, but don't write it off as a chore-filled day of monotony or simply slate it for hangover recovery.  

    Fill your day with activities you find genuinely restorative, whether that's settling down with a new book, going for a hike, or enjoying dinner with friends. Your brain will begin to re-associate Sundays with excitement and fun, not dread. 



    3. Whenever possible, ease into the week ahead

    Sometimes you can't avoid having a meeting or deadline first thing on Mondays. But if you do have some control over your schedule, try easing into the workweek. Knowing you'll be starting Monday off with a powerful morning routine or with work you enjoy can help quiet anxiety the night before. 



    4. If the Sunday scaries persist, listen to your gut

    Persistent, intense dread for several weeks or more should be taken seriously because it may signal depression, burnout, or another underlying condition. If you experience work-related insomnia or feel physically sick at the thought of walking into the office on Monday, speak with a doctor and find support

    Listen to your gut. Don't ignore signs that suggest a toxic workplace is taking a toll on your health. Moving on from a job that's not the right fit is a tough decision to make, but ultimately it will lead to positive change. 

    For most people, though, taking Sunday back won't require any enormous lifestyle or mindset changes — just a few habit tweaks here and there. Reclaiming your weekend, and more enjoyment of your life as a result, is well worth the effort.  




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    stressed man

    • Getting a case of the Mondays is relatively common. You've been eating and sleeping differently, and have to deal with an emotional shift.
    • On Monday, people are less happy — and that means their productivity and creativity take a hit.
    • To make Monday a little better, figure out what, exactly, is bothering you. Plan ahead for the week, including something to look forward to, and start off your Monday morning with something nice.
    • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

    My weekend was pretty solid. The weather was perfect, and I got to catch up with some friends that I hadn't seen in a while. But late Sunday afternoon, I got in a little bit of a rut. I wasn't exactly looking forward to Monday and the upcoming week. I don't even know why. There wasn't anything that I was dreading.

    It's not uncommon for people to have a bad case of the Mondays. Your sleep schedule and diet are off. There's also an emotional shift going from the weekend to the new workweek. Weekends are fun and filled with activities that we enjoy doing. Monday, however, represents going back to work and having to do the stuff that we don't always want to do. Considering that 70% of people hate or are "completely disengaged" from their job, this only makes Mondays even worse.

    A study shows that stock market returns are lower, and suicide rates are higher on this particular day of the week. No wonder our feelings can confirm that data⁠— that Monday is the least happy day of the week.

    As a result, creativity, motivation, and productivity all take a hit. The good news is that there are ways to boost your happiness and productivity on Monday. Here are eight proven techniques to cure those "Monday Blues."

    SEE ALSO: How to make someone like you in under 5 minutes, according to a relationship expert

    1. Identify the problem

    Sara Sutton Fell, CEO and founder of FlexJobs recommends composing a list of what's bothering you. "Maybe it's a negative co-worker or a meeting with your boss first thing on Monday morning. Maybe it's that you don't feel challenged ⁠— or maybe it's all of the above," she says. "In either case, clarifying what is bothering you can help you try to be active in finding solutions. It's a way of empowering you to take charge and try to improve the situation."



    2. Plan ahead

    Personally, I feel that we don't look forward to Mondays because, as the Bangles famously sang, "It's just another manic Monday." The reason? As soon as the alarm goes off, you jump out of bed and start tackling what seems like a million things at once. After frantically picking out your wardrobe and packing your lunch, you get to work and notice a packed inbox and a meaty to-do-list.

    One of the most effective ways to prevent a "Manic Monday" is to plan ahead. For example, on Friday afternoon, especially after 4 pm, write down your top three priorities that deserve your focus on Monday. Set realistic goals for the next week. And, most importantly, add them to your calendar so that you have an idea of what your work week will look like.

    Speaking of your calendar, review it so that you can prepare accordingly. For example, if there is a team meeting on Wednesday, then make sure that you've sent out reminders and an agenda.

    During the weekend, you can get ready for Monday by using a Sunday power hour. During this block of time, you could do some meal prep, pack your gym bag, and review your schedule. You could also compose a Monday morning hit list which is simply the first thing that you want to address.

    I'd also add that during the weekend, you run most of your errands and layout your wardrobe for the week. You don't have to waste your time during the rest of the week on these less important tasks. You'll also be making fewer decisions. That means you'll have more mental energy for your most important priorities.



    3. Start the week on the right foot

    One of the simplest ways to make your Monday suck less is by starting the day positively. Instead of grabbing your phone as soon as your eyes open, take a deep breath, and practice mindfulness. Replace those negative thoughts with more positive ones, like what you're grateful and excited for. If you didn't know, gratitude has been proven to reduce stress and improve productivity.

    Eat a healthy breakfast and get your body moving to release those endorphins. Listen to music that gets you pumped. Put on your power outfit. Do something beautiful like buying a stranger a cup of coffee or complementing an employee. While these may not seem like much, they're all simple ways to improve your mood and kick off the new week on the right foot.



    4. Create and stick to a routine

    A daily routine keeps us in check. Otherwise, we'll go through each day without purpose. While routines will vary, at the least they should include a morning ritual to set the day up for success. You should also work on your most important tasks when you're most productive and save less essential duties during productivity lulls. Spend your evenings relaxing.

    If possible, try to stick to your routine every day of the week. You don't have to wake up precisely at the same time or work on Saturday or Sunday. But by maintaining a routine, Monday mornings won't be as big of a shock to your system.



    5. Lighten your workload

    I understand that you have a full plate. As such, you might be tempted to go full throttle on Monday so that you don't fall behind. In reality, that's counterproductive.

    A better option would be to ease your way into the workweek. For example, use Mondays to redesign your workspace or work on a passion project. You could also go with the Jack Dorsey route and create theme days for each day of the week. For Dorsey, he focuses on management and running the company on Mondays.

    Also, don't schedule meetings on a Monday. There's a good chance that attendance will be low. Besides, having a meeting on Monday doesn't give attendees much time to prepare. Instead, schedule your meetings on a Tuesday or Wednesday afternoon.



    6. Socialize, but also protect your time

    It's in our DNA to be social. One of the best ways to cure a case of the Mondays is to bond with your tribe at work. "Work could be the best place for you on Monday because we are essentially cavemen in city suits," explains clinical psychologist Professor Alex Gardner. "We want to feel part of the tribe, so we go for a cup of tea, catch up, and then settle down to work."

    "Having done the tribal bonding, we are geared up for a productive week while some people who have started all guns blazing on a Monday morning may burn themselves out," adds Gardner. At the same time, you also have to be protective of your time.

    Block out specific times to socialize with your peers, such as during breaks between work or eating lunch together. However, when it's time for you to focus, eliminate any possible distractions. Turn off your smartphone. Close your office door or put on a pair of headphones.



    7. Schedule something fun

    Why do we look forward to the weekend? Usually, it's because we have something to look forward to. But you don't have to plan all of your fun activities for the weekend.

    Obviously, you don't want to exhaust yourself and plan an activity that will keep you out until midnight on a Wednesday. But, you could schedule lunch with a friend or a date night with your significant other. You could even plan for a future event, like purchasing concert tickets or booking a vacation. Hopefully, this will divert your attention from Monday to something awesome.



    8. Change your mindset about Monday

    "None of these things will cure the Sunday Scaries if you don't also change your thinking," writes Jessica Krampe for Calendar. "You have to stop seeing Monday as a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day, and you have to start looking at it for all of its possibilities: the opportunity it presents for a good start, the opening it gives you for a productive week."

    This Entrepreneur story was originally published on Business Insider September 30, 2019. 




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    Krista Federow

    • Krista Federow is an accountability coach with the business coaching firm Petra Coach, where she works with Certified Petra Coaches to help member companies scale their organizations.
    • On Friday evening, you may be ready to head home and enjoy the weekend. But what do you do when the Sunday scaries start to loom just a couple of days later?
    • Spend 15 minutes on your Friday afternoon getting ready for the next week. Think through your priorities, how the week went, and what you want to accomplish next.
    • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

    It's almost 5 p.m. on a Friday and you're packing up for a well-deserved weekend. But a couple of days later, as you approach the end of Sunday, anxiety creeps in over what the coming week may hold — and the mountain of tasks you have ahead.

    As an accountability coach at Petra Coach, I have participated in more than 80 company strategic planning sessions and 300 member company "daily huddle" meetings over the past year. Having reviewed countless priorities, I've noticed that the highest performing and most efficient team members spend the last part of Friday reflecting, organizing, and setting themselves up for the week ahead.

    That's right — the "Sunday scaries" don't have to haunt you. In the midst of end-of-the-week deadlines and chaos, you can stay on track and aligned with your goals by dedicating 15 minutes on a Friday afternoon to making strides for the next week.

    Why Friday?

    It's the best day to:

    • Reflect on your past week's accomplishments
    • Review tasks that were not completed and why
    • Determine the "plan of action" for the week ahead while it is still fresh in your mind
    • Run through your priorities and task sheet as a reminder of what's important for the period
    • Ensure you come in Monday morning stress free and ready to rock!

    Your Friday cheat sheet

    Here's what to do on Friday to be prepared for Monday:

    SEE ALSO: 4 fool-proof ways to prevent the 'Sunday scaries,' according to an executive coach

    1. Check off your top priority for today

    If you didn't complete it, it becomes your top priority for Monday morning.



    2. Update your Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

    Review your goals and priorities for the quarter. Check off all completed tasks and make changes where needed.



    3. Identify top tasks for the coming week

    Identify three to five tasks you will complete over the week that will move priorities forward.



    4. Fill in your personal high/low

    What was great about this past week that you want to share with your team on Monday? And what was not as great, but that you worked through? If you have more to add to this update after the weekend, do so.



    5. Fill in your business high/low

    Since it is Friday afternoon, you should be able to easily think of standout moments (both a positive and a negative) that you want to share from the work week.



    6. Write down any relevant information to share with the team

    What has happened these past few days that you want to pass on (e.g., client feedback, software updates, good news, etc.)?



    7. Review business topics/your 'parking lot'

    What ideas/topics would you like to discuss if there is time and room to do so?



    8. Look at your calendar

    Take a look at your calendar for next week and block off time to specifically focus on priority work.

    Now you're leaving the office on a Friday evening well versed on your priorities for the coming week and with a plan of action. Get ready to start Monday with purpose!




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    Stressed Millennials

    • The Sunday scaries — anxiety on Sunday nights about the work or school week ahead — are a major phenomenon. If you're dealing with them, it may be because you're not doing what you were meant to be doing.
    • However, they don't have to be a lifelong experience. Shift your mindset and figure out what you're grateful for in your current role.
    • Then, start intentionally making connections with people who are doing what you want to be doing, and seek out mentorship.
    • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

    Let's talk about anxiety on Sunday nights.

    Ever been there?

    Maybe you've seen people using "Sunday scaries" on social media. It's a term that's popped up in the last few years as a way for people to describe the anxiety they feel on Sundays when they think about the looming work week or school week that's about to begin.

    And it's no joke. A shocking survey by LinkedIn found that more than 90% of millennials and Gen Z worry about the week ahead on Sundays. That's scary stuff.

    That comes as no surprise when almost 70% of Americans are disengaged at work. Makes sense, doesn't it? Of course you're going to feel anxious the night before you have to return to a job you hate.

    SEE ALSO: 4 fool-proof ways to prevent the 'Sunday scaries,' according to an executive coach

    What causes the Sunday scaries?

    Every single one of us was created to fill a unique role and do work that matters. So, whenever we're not doing what we were created to do, anxiety starts bubbling up.

    In her book "Happiness at Work: Maximizing Your Psychological Capital for Success," Jessica Pryce-Jones calculates that workers will spend an average of 90,000 hours at work throughout their lifetimes. I refuse to believe we're supposed to be miserable for that many hours of our lives.

    So, what brings on the Sunday scaries? More often than not, they're a result of one — or a combination — of these five causes:

    1. You're not passionate about your work.
    2. You work in a toxic environment.
    3. You feel overwhelmed with your workload.
    4. You feel underappreciated by your leaders and/or peers.
    5. You're bored at work.

    Hopefully, when you look at that list, you realize you're not crazy about having the Sunday scaries.

    But that doesn't mean you have to experience this for the rest of your life. There's fulfillment waiting for you in work that matters.

    There's hope.

    Let's talk about two steps you can take to start moving in a new, anxiety-reducing direction.



    2 ways to get over the Sunday scaries

    Think of the Sunday scaries as a chronic illness. You'll be tempted to medicate or distract yourself in lots of different ways. But when you do that — when you only numb the symptoms for temporary relief — you'll become more and more immune to the "medication." And eventually, you'll be forced to face the pain head-on when it returns week after week.

    Don't waste your time "medicating." Don't live in that torturous cycle. Instead, do the hard work of finding a permanent solution to your Sunday night anxiety. Here are two solutions to help you get started:

    1. Change your mindset

    First, I encourage you to shift your mindset from one that dreads work to one that is grateful to even have work.

    No matter your situation, I'm confident you can come up with a list of things you're grateful for. Let me help you brainstorm:

    • A paycheck that provides some sort of financial stability
    • Good benefits or perks that your job provides
    • Great friends or mentors you've met at the office
    • A valuable skill you've learned that will go with you if you leave the company
    • A way to fund your future (this job will keep you afloat while you figure out a new path to work you love)

    I know it's easy to get bogged down by how much the negatives outweigh the positives at your job. But if you can be disciplined enough to focus on the good stuff (for now), you'll be better prepared to tackle the second, more permanent solution.

    2. Practice the proximity principle

    When I'm coaching someone who experiences the Sunday Scaries because of one of the five causes I listed above, I often advise them to find a new job. It's not always because the company they work for is a bad one, but because they're not working in their sweet spot (the place where what you do best and what you love to do most intersect).

    So, how do you get to your sweet spot? By practicing the proximity principle, which says: In order to do what you want to do, you have to be around people who are doing it and be in the places it's happening.

    You can start this journey right where you are! Be intentional about making connections with the people in your office, and then move out to those in your office building (are there other organizations in the same building?), your neighborhood, your city, and
    beyond.

    I want you to spend every spare moment making connections and building relationships.

    Invite people who have careers you might be interested in coffee or lunch. Volunteer with organizations in the field you're interested in or ask if you can shadow someone at their job. Find local clubs you can meet with regularly for mentorship and support (just Google "meetups for writers, developers, marketers, personal assistants," etc.).

    By being around these people and being in these places, you'll find open doors to opportunities you would never have discovered otherwise. And before you know it, when Sunday night rolls around, you won't dread another week of misery. Instead, you'll look forward to another week of new, exciting connections and opportunities.

    For a deeper dive into the proximity principle, check out my book "The Proximity Principle: The Proven Strategy That Will Lead to the Career You Love." Folks, you were created to create. You were created for a purpose and to offer a unique contribution to the world. This is why it's not okay to experience the Sunday scaries every single week. Don't try to treat or numb your symptoms. You have to get to the source to solve the real problem — and the source is doing work you're not passionate about.

    Embrace the journey because landing your dream job takes time, perseverance, and patience. But when you're enjoying every Sunday night and no longer lying awake with anxiety, you'll be grateful you pushed through so you can finally live the dream.
    You matter, and you have it what it takes. Press on!